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UNICEF Statistics Update: Child survival edition December 2012

Latest news on UNICEF's work on monitoring the situation of women and children. Central in this issue is child survival as this has been the theme of much of UNICEF's recent work.

1. Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed—Progress Report 2012: This progress report, produced by UNICEF, is the first of a new series of reports aimed at stimulating public dialogue and helping sustain political commitment globally towards ending preventable child mortality. It includes an in-depth analysis of child mortality and its causes.

2. Levels and Trends in Child Mortality—Report 2012: This technical report assesses progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goal 4 at the national, regional and global levels. It presents the latest estimates of under-five, infant and neonatal mortality developed by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME). Please also visit childmortality.org to download or visualize these estimates.

3. PLOS Medicine Collection on Child Mortality Estimation Methods: A peer-reviewed collection of methodological articles which makes a vital contribution to transparency on IGME's methodology for child mortality estimation. Topics include: an overview of the child mortality estimation methodology developed by the UN IGME; methods used to adjust for bias due to AIDS; estimation of sex differences in child mortality; and more. The Collection was produced with support from UNICEF and the independent technical advisory group of the UN IGME.

4. Under-five mortality dashboard: This exciting tool offers an interactive exploration of the causes of death and trends in child mortality, allows for cross-country comparisons, and among other features uses a bubble graph for further exploring the relationship between child mortality and income.

5. Child survival trends presentation by Hans Rosling. In this dynamic presentation made during the Social Good Summit held in September, Hans Rosling (creator of Gapminder) explains child survival trends using data from the Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed as well as from Levels and Trends in Child Mortality reports (note that Hans Rosling’s presentation starts at 3 minutes and 25 seconds).

Other highlights:

6. Launch of DevInfo 7.0: At the OECD World Forum in Delhi UNICEF launched the latest version of the DevInfo data platform, DevInfo 7.0 on behalf of the UN system. The new version, available at devinfo.org, allows much faster access to data from many databases, additional data presentation features and a user-friendly function for mapping your own datasets. It is available at www.devinfo.org.

7. Nutrition: Thanks to a new report jointly produced by UNICEF, the World Health Organisation and the World Bank, we now have for the first time harmonized prevalence and number estimates of stunting, underweight, wasting and overweight at the global and regional levels. Estimates for 2011 and trends since 1990 are also presented by various regional and income classifications.

8. Fifth round of Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS): UNICEF’s Deputy Executive Director recently launched the fifth round of MICS. Data collected through MICS are vital for generating the evidence base for development efforts on a wide range of topics including health, education and equity monitoring. MICS are typically carried out by government organizations, with the technical and financial support of UNICEF and its partners. MICS5 was piloted in Bogra and Sirajganj, Bangladesh, in May and June 2012 ( video of the pilot). The pilot was hosted by the Government of Bangladesh’s Bureau of Statistics and the UNICEF Country Office. We expect around 45 countries to participate MICS5. For more information please see the MICS5 pages on childinfo.org. (Read more about MICS5)
   

Other recent major publications involving the Statistics and Monitoring Section of UNICEF:


Countdown to 2015. Maternal, Newborn & Child Survival: Building a Future for Women and Children: The 2012 Report
Pneumonia and diarrhoea: Tackling the deadliest diseases for the world’s poorest children
Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2010
Progress for Children: “A report card on adolescents”
Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation – 2012 Update
Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, 2012
Journal articles on immunization


The Statistics and Monitoring Section (SMS) is at the core of UNICEF’s statistical work: it supports data collection through its Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS); leads data analysis and; enhances data dissemination. To find out more about our work, visit us regularly at www.childinfo.org.
 

Tags: ["child research", "statistics", "monitoring", "child survival", "health", "women", "maternal mortality", "indicators"]
Published Dec. 17, 2012 10:53 AM - Last modified Apr. 17, 2013 3:22 PM