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African Child Policy Forum celebrates 10 years of commitment to children in Africa!

On the 18th November the African Child Policy Forum (ACPF)  launched the “African Report on Child Wellbeing 2013: Towards Greater Accountability to Africa’s Children”, its flagship report on how child-friendly African governments are, with rankings of the Child-Friendliness Index (as developed by ACPF and based on 44 indicators) for 2013, and as compared to 2008. It also held a Panel discussion with its partners about its past and future.

The event took place on 18 November 2013 at the Sheraton Addis Hotel, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

On this occasion, ACPF has launched the "African Report on Child Wellbeing 2013: Towards Greater Accountability to Africa's Children".

ACPF has also held a partners' meeting on "ACPF’s future role in promoting children’s wellbeing in Africa".

Visit the  website dedicated to ACPF's 10th Anniversary, and have your say! Access media resources on ACPF's Tenth Anniversary and the Launch Event of the African Report on Child Wellbeing 2013

Read more : http://www.africanchildforum.org/10years/

As part of the celebration of its 10th Anniversary, ACPF luanched its flagship report, “The African Report on Child Wellbeing 2013: Towards Greater Accountability to Africa’s Children”. The report is also available in French.

"New report ranks Africa’s most and least child-friendly countries and reveals that Africa has become more child-friendly, but still faces serious challenges "

 The new flagship report by The African Child Policy Forum (ACPF) - The African Report on Child Wellbeing 2013: Towards Greater Accountability to Africa’s Children - analyses and ranks the performance of 52 African governments in a Child-Friendly Index comparing progress since the first ranking in 2008.

The countries that score highest as the “most child-friendly” are Mauritius (also top of the ranking in 2008), South Africa, Tunisia, Egypt, Cape Verde, Rwanda, Lesotho, Algeria, Swaziland and Morocco.  Those scoring lowest and categorised as the “least child-friendly”  are Chad, Eritrea, Sao Tome and Principe, Zimbabwe, Comoros, Central African Republic (CAR), Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and Mauritania, most of them under-investing in education and health.

Developed by ACPF – an independent, not-for-profit, pan-African institution of policy research and dialogue on the African child – the Child Friendliness Index is based on 44 indicators that measure government’s commitment to the protection of their children, provision for their children’s basic needs and the participation of children in decisions that affect them.

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Tags: African Child Policy Forum, the African Child, report 2013, panel discussion
Published Nov. 25, 2013 12:45 PM